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We'll keep you updated on the latest news and information about JamBios. You'll find news mentions, press releases, events and activities, investment information, announcements and an occasional photo, video or podcast with JamBios spokesperson Henry Ian Cusick. You can also follow us on Facebook and Twitter for daily and weekly updates.

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2018 Holiday Gift Guide: Telling Life Stories With JamBios, Together With Friends & Family

What if I told you that you could write the stories of your life, together with your friends and family?

Right now is the perfect time to start. I love this in between time after the first month of school, and before the crazy of the holiday season. Everyone really thinks I love summer best, and although they’re right, I’m also harboring a deep love for the rich hues and cool breezes of October. It’s astonishing. Every weekend is filled in the books – and I’m ready to photograph other families and go on leaf peeping, leaf pile jumping and apple/pumpkin picking adventures with my family.

What if I told you that you could write the stories of your life, together with your friends and family? Check out my holiday gift guide post about JamBios!

And the richness of the season only makes me want to share my stories. Have you heard about JamBios? It provides a collaborative place to write and save the stories of your life with your loved ones. I love that there are 100s of Chapter topics to choose from, and that it makes it easy to remember your first car, your first kiss, and so on. These stories only get better when you invite your loved ones to add their memories. Best part, other than the awesomeness? It’s free to use!

What if I told you that you could write the stories of your life, together with your friends and family? Check out my holiday gift guide post about JamBios!

 

Holiday Gift Guide Time!

With the holidays coming, this is the perfect time to begin your JamBios to turn into a JamBook for a gift. Or you can make one to simply pass around during the holidays. It’s such a simple and wonderful idea. You can write about your childhood best friends AND invite them to add their own memories of those long ago days. JamBios is about remembering together since the platform is designed for everyone to help share their memories. Plus, it has a book-like format to make it easy to organize all of your group’s stories. They’re perfect for old memories, wedding memoirs, baby and kid books, memorials and so much more. You save your group’s stories online and/or turn them into professionally printed JamBooks.

 

What if I told you that you could write the stories of your life, together with your friends and family? Check out my holiday gift guide post about JamBios!

Think of them as beautiful, personalized memory books. And it’s easy to make! You choose your content and cover details, and in an instant, you have a gorgeously formatted JamBook to keep forever. You can choose between 100+ chapters and you can create sub-chapters, including babies, family, travel, relationships, moments, custom, and more. And, add in photos and videos. JamBooks are hardcover books that make the BEST holiday gifts, birthday gifts, coffee table books, etc.

Some of my favorite features:

1 – Over 100 chapter topics to choose from (Pets, Houses, Children, Summers, Dreams, Family Dysfunctions, Love Crushes, Greatest Challenges, etc.)

2 – Memory triggers specific to each chapter topic from “Monty,” an avatar voiced by actor Henry Ian Cusick from LOST and The 100

3 – The option to invite others to add their own recollections of a given event or other memory, capturing details you may not remember or may not have known

4 – The ability to add photos as well as audio and video links

Get started today and check out more info here.

A New Tool to Capture Your Family's Most Cherished Memories

Throughout life, we are all going to experience different things, events, and overall challenges that life brings. That’s one of the beautiful factors of living the lives we have. There are so many great things to look forward to and discover out there. Plus, you have a ton of friends and family members to go through it with you. Sometimes, you just wish you could capture everything you feel is important. It’s just hard to find something that can make that happen, that is, until now.

A LIFE WORTH REMEMBERING

Believe it or not, you may have a ton of questions that you constantly ask yourself. So, have you ever wanted to document the highlights and the lowlights of your life? In a sense to where you will be able to keep all of your memories in one place. Take a second and think about everything you do in life. Family holidays, your children’s first ever school day, or even memories of lost ones. Being able to hold onto these kinds of memories is something a lot of people find important. Before you may not have known of a dependable way of doing so. Now, you can turn your attention to JamBios.

A New Tool To Capture Your Family's Most Cherished Memories

You don’t want to capture a memory with parts of the story that’ll remain untold. That’s why you would want something that can help you truly reminisce. JamBios happens to be a free online “reminiscing” platform. What they do is offer an all-new chapter-style framework that offers the perfect memory experience. Families can write and save all of their shared experiences and any life stories they cherish.

It’s simple to set up and even simpler to be a part of. One person signs up as the main user (admin) and can then invite other family members like:

  • Spouses
  • Children
  • Grandparents
  • Close Friends
  • And More!

Each person will be able to bring their own perspective enriching and providing a fuller picture of the collective memory. Just imagine how much can be cherished in one place! Holding onto the best time in life and the best people in your life is truly special. So, be sure to check out all of the information I have for you above.

Writing to Preserve and Revive Memory

If you’re old enough to remember the John F. Kennedy assassination or the Cuban missile crisis, you’re probably realizing that your memory isn’t what it used to be. Indeed, the Centers for Disease Control has reported that one in eight Americans over the age of 60 complains of worsening memory loss. The problem may be related to a medical condition, emotional problems, cognitive impairment or simply the indignities of aging, but it’s distressing regardless of the cause.

As it turns out, one way to preserve and in some cases even enhance memory is to proactively revisit your past. A technique called reminiscence therapy that is widely used in applications ranging from mental health interventions to memory care in nursing homes is one form. But simply committing your life experiences to paper (virtual or otherwise) can be helpful and even therapeutic.

That, at least, is what we hear from users of JamBios, a free online platform that provides a chapter-style framework to write and save the stories of your life. In one case, for example, a woman who suffered severe trauma as a child discovered that using the platform to write about her memories was like a key that unlocked them: “I’ve found it easier to remember my past, even those memories which I thought no amount of therapy and psychoanalysis would bring back.”

Research also shows the health benefits of writing. Over a decade ago, the American Psychological Association published a study indicating that expressive writing reduces “intrusive and avoidant thoughts about negative events and improves working memory.” Researchers concluded that these improvements help individuals cope more effectively with stress, because they have freed up cognitive resources.

More recently, in discussing the use of writing in education, neurologist Judy Willis MD noted that writing can “enhance the brain’s intake, processing, retaining, and retrieving of information… it promotes the brain’s attentive focus … boosts long-term memory, illuminates patterns, gives the brain time for reflection, and when well-guided, is a source of conceptual development and stimulus of the brain’s highest cognition.” In other words, writing can transform an individual’s brain and memory.

What to Know About Writing as Therapy

For many people — myself included — writing is hugely therapeutic. Not all writing, of course — some of those term papers I wrote in college were far more anxiety-inducing than relieving, and it’s not like every email I send takes a weight off my shoulders.

But there’s a reason why we love journaling so much. Science has proven that it’s got all kinds of benefits.

We at FBG aren’t the only ones who are preaching about the power of writing, of course. Recently, we were introduced to JamBios, an online journaling website designed to help people who’ve gone through painful life experiences and want to use expressive writing as a type of therapy. Beth Carvin, the CEO of JamBios, agreed to answer a few questions about how expressive writing works, who can do it, and whether there’s anyone who should steer clear — because, guys, the pen truly is mighty, and when it comes to using it for therapy, there are some things you might want to watch out for.

What, exactly, is involved in expressive writing? Is it any different than what many people would call journaling?

Beth Carvin: Expressive writing, also known as therapeutic writing (and sometimes “scriptotherapy”) is different from journaling, though some people might naturally journal in this way. Expressive writing is writing freely one’s deepest emotions, thoughts and feelings about a particular event or topic. The writing is done continuously for a period of time (generally 15-20 minutes for 3 or 4 days) without worry of sentence structure, spelling and grammar. I like to think of it as writing deeply from the heart.

Is expressive writing as therapy something that can benefit anyone? Is it particularly helpful for people with certain issues?

BC: Expressive writing is an acknowledged therapy with 200-plus academic research studies scientifically proving results. Some of these are astonishing such as:

  • improving the immune function by increasing white blood cells
  • having fewer doctor visits for flu and upper respiratory conditions than those who wrote about ordinary events
  • reduced work/task errors
  • increased GPA of students
  • improved lung function in asthmatics
  • reduced irritable bowel symptoms
  • lessened the distress of migraines
  • increased rate of unemployed being hired
  • reduction of stress and anxiety and improved social relations and life enjoyment

As you can see, these kinds of benefits can help a wide range of people. Most of us, even the happiest, have some emotional events in our past that we may not have completely worked through, even if we don’t know it.

How does this help people who have gone through painful life experiences?

BC: There are a variety of theories on why expressive writing works so well. Some researchers believe that it turns those painful life events from a sensory experience into a concrete narrative that our brains can then set aside. I think of the painful experiences as being like a cloud or vapor that is always around you without you knowing it. We can’t grab a hold of it. Therefore a part of our brain is always having to deal with it. Our working memory, which helps us perform tasks, is always bothered by it. When we write expressively, that cloud turns into something solid. Researchers believe that language and structure turn the untenable into something solid that can be stored appropriately. It no longer annoys and uses up our unconscious processing power.

What are the biggest challenges people face when they first start writing as therapy?

BC: Experts in expressive writing warn that some people may have a difficult time writing with emotion. They turn their writing into an essay on a subject quoting philosophers and writing like an academic paper. Instead, they should endeavor to write very personally about the event and examine their deepest thoughts and emotions. They can describe the situation, how they felt when it occurred, how they feel about it now, how it affected their life, what they have learned, lost or gained as a result of it, and how it will impact their future.

Is there anything people should know before they begin?

BC: Here are some tips:

  • The greatest benefits may happen when you write about something that is secret or of which you are ashamed.
  • It’s okay to feel a little sad afterwards, just as you might feel after reading a sad book or watching an emotional movie.
  • You can write freehand on paper, type on a computer or use an online memory platform like JamBios.
  • You do not need to share your writing. You can even throw it away or delete it after you’ve written it.

Last, a word of caution: if someone is extremely distressed and writing about a particular topic is going to trigger an acute response requiring hospitalization, they should not do so or stop immediately.

Do you practice expressive writing in this way? Are you a journal-keeper — and were you as a kid? I kept a lot of diaries when I was younger, and although I do a fair bit of journaling now, especially when I have a specific experience to work through, I really struggle to make it a daily practice these days. Maybe it’s because I spend all day writing for work … but I do still love it when I make a point to do it! —Kristen

How to Use Expressive Writing for Healing and Growth After 50

Women who have passed the age 50 milestone have the benefit of 5 full decades of life to reflect on – the personal triumphs and losses, the moments shared with loved ones, the experiences that shaped who they are today. If you’ve ever poured your feelings into a private journal or an unsent letter, you likely know how good it feels to get your thoughts down on paper. 

Expressive writing, also known as therapeutic writing, is the act of freely writing your deepest emotions, thoughts and feelings about a particular event or topic. Sometimes known as “scriptotherapy,” this type of writing is done continuously for a certain period of time (generally 15-20 minutes for three or four days) without worrying about sentence structure, spelling or grammar. Expressive writing is writing deeply from the heart—in other words, writing to express yourself.

Expressive writing is an acknowledged therapy with scientifically proven results from more than 200 academic research studies. Some of the positive effects are astonishing, such as:

  • improvement in immune function through increase of white blood cells
  • fewer doctor visits for patients with flu and upper respiratory conditions than those who wrote about ordinary events
  • reduced errors in work or tasks
  • improved lung function in asthmatics
  • reduction in irritable bowel symptoms
  • lessened distress from migraines
  • increased rate of hiring for the unemployed
  • and, of course, reduction of stress and anxiety
  • and improved social relations and life enjoyment.

As evidenced, the physical and mental benefits of expressive writing can help a wide range of people—especially if you’ve gone through a painful life experience. Most of us, even the happiest, have some emotional events from the past that we may not have completely worked through (even if we aren’t consciously aware of it).

There are a variety of theories on why expressive writing works so well. Some researchers theorize that it turns painful life events from sensory experiences into a concrete narrative that our brains can then set aside.

We might imagine a traumatic life event as a cloud that’s always around us. We can’t grab ahold of it—and may not even know it’s still there. Therefore, a part of our brain must constantly to deal with it. Its presence impacts our working memory, which is responsible for helping us perform tasks. In short, we find ourselves weighed down.

Researchers believe that language and structure turn the untenable into something that can be stored appropriately. When we write expressively, that cloud becomes something solid that we can take hold of and put away. It can no longer use up our unconscious processing power.

Experts in therapeutic writing warn that some people may have difficulty articulating their emotions about a painful event and instead write as though they are crafting an academic article. The best way to write therapeutically is to write very personally about the event in question and examine one’s deepest thoughts and emotions. A person might describe the situation; how they felt when it occurred; how they feel about it now; how it affected their life; what they have learned, lost or gained as a result of it; and how it will impact their future. In this way, a person can write therapeutically and gain the positive effects of expressive writing.

Here are some tips:

  • The greatest benefits may happen when you write about a secret or something of which you are ashamed.
  • It’s okay to feel a little sad afterward, just as you might feel after reading a sad book or watching an emotional movie.
  • You can write freehand on paper, type on a computer or use an online memory platform like JamBios.
  • You do not need to share your writing. You can even throw it away or delete it after you’ve written it.

(A word of caution: if you are extremely distressed, and writing about a particular topic will trigger an acute response requiring hospitalization, you should not do so—or stop immediately.)

Whether you call it expressive writing, therapeutic writing or scriptotherapy, writing out your deepest thoughts and emotions can be good for not only the mind, but also the body. If you’re interested in enjoying the benefits of expressing yourself through writing, take 15-20 minutes today to sit down and remember—and let the feelings flow.

Six Ways That Expressive Writing Can Be Therapeutic

Expressive writing involves writing about your thoughts, feelings and experiences—not what you did today or a blow-by-blow travelogue of your last trip, but your deepest emotions about yourself, your life and events from your past or present. There's no need to worry about sentence structure, spelling or grammar – just write from the heart and let it all out. Studies have shown a variety of therapeutic benefits.

Writing helps free up space on your mental hard drive.

Psychologist Dr. James Pennebaker, a pioneer in the field of using expressive writing as therapy, says that “Writing really forces a structure that your mind doesn’t have. It allows you to start putting things together” in order to better understand your experience. Psychotherapist and journaling expert Maud Purcell notes that the process also removes mental blocks, in part by engaging the analytical left hemisphere of the brain and freeing up the right brain for creativity, feeling and intuition.

Some writing each day keeps the doctor away. 
Research has shown that expressive writing can lower blood pressure, boost immune system function, enhance memory, improve lung function in asthmatics, lessen distress from migraines, and even reduce irritable bowel symptoms. When gastroenterologist Dr. Albena Halpert asked 103 IBS patients to put their thoughts and emotions about their condition on paper, for example, the 82 that successfully completed 30-minute writing sessions for four consecutive days displayed substantial improvements in the severity of their disease as well as their negative thoughts related to it.

Putting trauma into words can help ease the pain. 

“Emotional upheavals touch every part of our lives,” says Dr. Pennebaker. “You don’t just lose a job, you don’t just get divorced. These things affect all aspects of who we are—our financial situation, our relationships with others, our views of ourselves. Writing helps us focus and organize the experience.” Users of JamBios, a digital writing platform for sharing and saving memories, have used the site to work through traumatic experiences like amnesia, childhood trauma and drug addiction. In some cases, they have found it so therapeutic that they have submitted their entries to the site’s public gallery to share their healing with others.

Expressive writing can make you a star student… or employee of the month.

Writing about a traumatic experience for just 15-20 minutes a day for three or four days has been shown to result in positive mental changes, including less stress and anxiety, decreased depressive symptoms and greater psychological well-being. Participants in studies on expressive writing have also reported less absenteeism from work, fewer errors in tasks, improvements in school grades, richer social lives, better ability to get a job, and an overall increase in life enjoyment. 

Examining your experiences can rewire your brain.

In a manner similar to cognitive behavioral therapy, writing can change your thoughts, which in turn can change your emotions and your actions. Health psychology researcher Susan Lutgendorf, PhD, conducted an intensive study on the subject with her student Phil Ullrich. According to their findings, people who tried to find significance in their traumatic experiences through writing displayed greater awareness of the bright side of an upsetting event. “You need focused thought as well as emotions,” says Lutgendorf. “An individual needs to find meaning in a traumatic memory as well as to feel the related emotions to reap positive benefits from the writing exercise.”

Writing it down can build you up.

Using writing to confront your demons can make you a more resilient person. Sue, a woman who has used the JamBios reminiscing platform to express her thoughts about her painful past, says that writing has been a “safety valve” and “means of catharsis” since her early teens. “It (writing) doesn’t have to measure up to anyone’s standard of good, not even your own,” she says. “It’s just about transferring the pain from your head where it can build up to dangerous, potentially lethal levels, into a safe space where you can look at it and gain some perspective.” 

 

About the Author:Beth N. Carvin is a business executive, entrepreneur and researcher. She is the CEO of Nobscot Corporation, an enterprise software company that helps companies retain employees and manage corporate mentoring programs. She is an expert in human resources and diversity and has been a keynote speaker and panelist at numerous events across the nation. Her newest venture, JamBios, helps people enjoy reminiscing and writing the stories from their life, together with friends and family. Originally from Boston, for the past 27 years she has been living her best life on the islands of Hawaii.

Note: If you are interested in writing for WE Magazine for Women check out our submission guidelines: https://wemagazineforwomen.com/about/submission-guidelines/

Heidi Richards Mooney, Publisher & Editor In Chief

WE Magazine for Women

www.WEMagazineforWomen.com

2018 Top 40 Magazines for Women

Writing to Preserve and Revive Memory

If you’re old enough to remember the John F. Kennedy assassination or the Cuban missile crisis, you’re probably realizing that your memory isn’t what it used to be. Indeed, the Centers for Disease Control has reported that one in eight Americans over the age of 60 complains of worsening memory loss. The problem may be related to a medical condition, emotional problems, cognitive impairment or simply the indignities of aging, but it’s distressing regardless of the cause.

As it turns out, one way to preserve and in some cases even enhance memory is to proactively revisit your past. A technique called reminiscence therapy that is widely used in applications ranging from mental health interventions to memory care in nursing homes is one form. But simply committing your life experiences to paper (virtual or otherwise) can be helpful and even therapeutic.

 

That, at least, is what we hear from users of JamBios, a free online platform that provides a chapter-style framework to write and save the stories of your life. In one case, for example, a woman who suffered severe trauma as a child discovered that using the platform to write about her memories was like a key that unlocked them: “I’ve found it easier to remember my past, even those memories which I thought no amount of therapy and psychoanalysis would bring back.”

Research also shows the health benefits of writing. Over a decade ago, the American Psychological Association published a study indicating that expressive writing reduces “intrusive and avoidant thoughts about negative events and improves working memory.” Researchers concluded that these improvements help individuals cope more effectively with stress, because they have freed up cognitive resources.

More recently, in discussing the use of writing in education, neurologist Judy Willis MD noted that writing can “enhance the brain’s intake, processing, retaining, and retrieving of information… it promotes the brain’s attentive focus … boosts long-term memory, illuminates patterns, gives the brain time for reflection, and when well-guided, is a source of conceptual development and stimulus of the brain’s highest cognition.” In other words, writing can transform an individual’s brain and memory.

 

Whether you or someone you know is impacted by a memory deficit, or you are simply looking for a way to tell your own story for yourself and your family, here are five simple strategies for preserving and sharing your memories in writing.

#1: Choose a writing aid

Today’s technology offers a variety of writing platforms to help you organize your thoughts and store them in one place. There are personal blogs, journaling applications, memoir writing software, and reminiscing platforms like JamBios that offer pre-defined topics to help trigger memories. Many of these solutions are free and can give you the structure you need to both simplify and encourage the process.

#2: Use prompts

When people sit down to write for the first time, they often don’t know where to begin. A prompt like “Who was your childhood best friend?” or “What was the first pet you owned?” can provide direction as well as get the memory juices flowing. The same thing can be accomplished by using prompts like objects or photos.

Says one JamBios user, “A simple question like ‘What’s your favorite book?’ brings you back to that time you were 5 years old and fell in love with Harry Potter for the first time. And then, just like that, you remember. You, stealing ‘The Philosopher’s Stone’ copy your dad had from his bedside table and sneaking behind a couch to read it before he came home … A small thing like a book straightens my timeline of memories in such a way that, if I try to think as hard as I can about it, I can start recalling some other things from that period of time. And that way, things keep coming back, and back, and back.”

#3: Don’t worry about chronology

Recording your memories doesn’t always have to follow a chronological order. Sometimes attempting to follow a timeline can prevent you from writing about what you’re feeling or affect what you’re inspired to share. I’ve learned from personal experience that it’s better to write about a memory or a moment in time as you think about it, even if it’s out of sequence with other memories you’ve jotted down.

Maybe it’s your first car or your first kiss. Your favorite pets or favorite trips. Family holidays or family problems. Write what you want, when you want, and break it up into pieces to avoid feeling overwhelmed by the size of the project.

#4: Find your writing sweet spot

Some people write better after their first cup of coffee. Others are more productive midday or at night. Start by recognizing what works best for you. Ask yourself when your words seem to flow best. Is it as soon as a memory pops into your head? Is it when you wake up each morning, or before you go to sleep each night? Try different approaches until you find the one that clicks.

#5: Invite others to contribute

Several years ago, my family began reminiscing via a group email. We wrote about an old bar in Boston that my grandfather owned, which prompted an engrossing series of stories from my dad and uncles about the barmaids, the keys to the liquor cabinet, and some incidents involving local law enforcement that many of us had never heard. The more we wrote, the more everyone wanted to share and chime in, and the more we learned.

This kind of collaboration, made easy by today’s online environment, helps unearth details you may not remember or may not have known. With or without memory loss, it enriches the experience of taking a trip down memory lane.

Whether you or a loved one is facing memory challenges, or you simply want to preserve the memories you have for your children or grandchildren, filling in the memory gaps can be rewarding. With today’s technology, it’s easy to get started and remain consistent. There’s evidence it improves health and well-being. And if nothing else, it can be a great source of pleasure for you as well as your friends and family.

Beth N. Carvin is CEO and co-founder of JamBios (www.jambios.com), a collaborative writing application and social platform for reminiscing, sharing and preserving memories.

How to Preserve and Revive Your Memory Through Writing by The Pittsburgh Better Times Team

The Centers for Disease Control reports that one in eight Americans over age 60 complain of worsening memory loss. The problem may be related to a medical condition, emotional problems, cognitive impairment or simply the indignities of aging, but it’s distressing regardless of the cause.

One way to preserve and possibly enhance memory is to proactively revisit your past. Reminiscence therapy is one technique option, with uses ranging from mental health interventions to memory care in nursing homes. But sometimes, simply committing your life experiences to paper (virtual or otherwise) can also be helpful and even therapeutic.

A variety of research studies have explored the health benefits of writing. The American Psychological Association, for instance, published a study indicating that expressive writing reduces “intrusive and avoidant thoughts about negative events,” allowing for better coping and improved working memory. Additionally, work by neurologist Judy Willis MD finds that reflective writing, when well guided, may be a source of conceptual development and stimulate the “brain’s highest cognition.”

Whether you or someone you know is impacted by a memory deficit, or you’re simply seeking a way to tell your own story for yourself and your family, here are five simple strategies for preserving and sharing your memories in writing.

#1: Choose a writing aid

There are a variety of online writing platforms to help you organize your thoughts and store them in one place, including journaling apps, memoir-writing software, and other platforms with pre-defined topics to help trigger memories. Many of these solutions are free and can give you the structure you need to both simplify and encourage the process.

#2: Use prompts

A common struggle for people writing for the first time is not knowing where to begin. Prompts like “Who was your childhood best friend?” can provide direction and inspiration. Object or photo prompts may be similarly effective.

A simple question like ‘What’s your favorite book?’ can bring you back to that time you were 8 years old and finished your first Nancy Drew book (or maybe Hardy Boys book if you’re a man.) A small thing like a book can bring clarity to the timeline of the memory, and lead you to recall other things from that same time period.

#3: Don’t worry about chronology

The process of recording your memories doesn’t always have to follow a chronological order. Sometimes following a timeline can take away focus and affect what you’re inspired to share. It’s generally better to write about a memory or a moment in time as you think about it, even if it’s out of sequence with other memories you’ve jotted down.

Maybe it’s your first car or your first kiss. Write what you want, when you want, and break it up into pieces to avoid feeling overwhelmed by the size of the project.

#4: Find your writing sweet spot

Some people write better after their first cup of coffee. Others are more productive midday or at night. Start by recognizing what works best for you. Ask yourself when your words seem to flow best. Is it as soon as a memory pops into your head? Is it when you wake up, or before you go to sleep? Try different approaches until you find the one that clicks.

#5: Invite others to contribute

Several years ago, my family began reminiscing via a group email. We wrote about an old bar in Boston that my grandfather owned, which prompted an engrossing series of stories from my dad and uncles about the barmaids, the keys to the liquor cabinet, and some incidents involving local law enforcement that many of us had never heard. The more we wrote, the more everyone wanted to chime in, and the more we learned.

This kind of collaboration, made easy by today’s online environment, helps unearth details you may not remember or may not have known.

Whether you or a loved one is facing memory challenges, or you simply want to preserve your memories for your children or grandchildren, filling in the memory gaps can be rewarding. There’s evidence it improves health and well-being. And if nothing else, it can be a great source of pleasure for you as well as your friends and family.

AUTHOR BIO:

Beth N. Carvin is CEO and co-founder of JamBios (www.jambios.com), a collaborative writing application and social platform for reminiscing, sharing and preserving memories. The company is headquartered in Honolulu, Hawaii.